Psychedelic Movement

The Psychedelic Movement spread in the hippie environment in 1964-1965. This movement did not just affect the music, it affected the entire culture; the way of living, like the music, how people were dressed, literature and philosophy.

The Psychedelic Movement spread in the hippie environment in 1960-1975. This movement did not just affect the music, it affected the entire culture; the way of living, like the music, how people were dressed, literature and philosophy. The movement is inspired by hallucinations, consciousness and distortions you get from drugs like LSD.

The word “psychedelic comes from Greek; the word “psyche” and “Delos” and means “min feasting” or “soul manifesting”. The art became very popular by the hippie-environment in the mid-1960s.


The psychedelic movement, or “Psychedelia” is an amazing, mind-blowing colourful art, with bright and highly contrasting colours, spirals and concentric circles. The art was mostly used on concert posters and album covers. The psychedelic posters were inspired by Art Nouveau, Dada and Pop Art. but the special thing about this art was that Psychedelia was inspired by psychedelic experience; the hallucinations you get from psychoactive drugs, like LSD. Once a psychiatrist, Oscar Janiger did an artistic experiment with 50 artists included. The experiment was that each artist was going to make a painting from life and they were free to choose what they wanted to paint. After, they were asked to make the same painting under the influence of LSD. These two paintings were compared by Janiger and the artist itself, and immediately the artists reported that the influence of this drug embraced their creativity.
The psychedelic posters were inspired by Art Nouveau, Dada and Pop Art.

The discovery of LSD and its subsequent popularity as an agent that produces altered states of consciousness was at the core of the Psychedelic Art movement; however, other drugs were also used as a means of inducing certain types of artistic expressions. Various poster artists of San Francisco were responsible for launching the Psychedelic Art movement during the 1960s such as Rick Griffon, Wes Wilson, and Victor Moscoso. The psychedelic style peaked between 1966 and 1972. Many works, especially evident in concert and event posters, depicted a strong colour palette—usually of contrasting colours—along with ornate lettering, and kaleidoscopic swirls. The art of this period also reflected Art Nouveau and Victorian influences.

The psychedelic art that began to surface in the mid-1960s frequently gave expression to drug-induced visions. Its stylistic trademark was vivid color, vibrant energy, flowing organic patterns, and a tendency to compress time and space so that images from the most disparate cultures and time periods were brought together in elaborate montages.” (Albright)

Even as fashions have changed, and art and culture movements have come and gone, certain artists have steadfastly devoted themselves to psychedelia. Well-known examples are Amanda Sage, Alex Grey, and Robert Venosa. These artists have developed unique and distinct styles that while containing elements that are “psychedelic”, are clearly artistic expressions that transcend simple categorization. While it is not necessary to use psychedelics to arrive at such a stage of artistic development, serious psychedelic artists are demonstrating that there is tangible technique to obtaining visions, and that technique is the creative use of psychedelic drugs.

https://99designs.com.au/blog/design-history-movements/tripping-history-psychedelic-design/

http://www.haaliendesign.com/GDhist/psychedelic_movement.html#:~:text=The%20psychedelic%20Movement%2C%20or%20%E2%80%9CPsychedelia,Nouveau%2C%20Dada%20and%20Pop%20Art

http://www.arthistory.net/psychedelic-art

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